Scape's Cook Book: The Recipe Files

Discussion in '-off topic-' started by Jae, Oct 10, 2007.

  1. PureElegance -eternite- eternite

    PureElegance
    Joined: 05 Jul 2006
    Posts: 4655
    Location: In Klaha's Closet
    Posted: Sun Jun 10, 2012 7:52 pm

    faith wrote:
    I haven't had an artichoke in a million years, I don't even remember if I liked it. ::kisaki::
    I don't know if it's a fashionable thing or not (I'm not knowledgeable about that and I'm not really interested), but I'm just searching randomly through Fodor's/recommendations/internet/historical places. But yeah, I keep coming upon artichokes and foie gras. I made reservations to these (I'm probably going to a couple of other places you mentioned along with Procope) because of the location/building/history, but I hear the food is good as well. I liked what you said about the restaurants though, how they normally have the same menus, that's good to know XD It's all kind of mind-boggling and hard to choose from though.

    http://www.procope.com/ (oldest cafe in Paris)
    http://www.cieldeparis.com/ (the view!)
    http://www.fermettemarbeuf.com/ (old too! I'm so glad it wasn't destroyed.)

    and here:
    [​IMG]
    ::meev::

    I also didn't know that foie gras was controversial. I didn't know about the forced feeding or any of that, hm.

    sing once again with meee, our strange dueeeet.
    my power over youuuuu,
    grows stronger yeeeet.
     
  2. Iskanderia -member- -member-

    Iskanderia
    Joined: 30 Jan 2007
    Posts: 2506
    Posted: Sun Jun 10, 2012 9:25 pm

    Seared foie gras is so ridiculously good. I wish I could eat it with a clear conscience.

    @Faith: crystallized ginger is in every supermarket over here. I eat it as a snack.
     
  3. Berserk -member- -member-

    Berserk
    Joined: 13 Apr 2006
    Posts: 2383
    Location: Michigan
    Posted: Sun Jun 10, 2012 10:51 pm

    I just wiki'd artichokes, and it turns out that they're gigantic thistles! I've always known what they look like when they're prepared for food, but I had no idea the actual plant looked like this:

    [​IMG]

    I've really only eaten them at Italian restaurants I think, like on "Mediterranean style" pizza. They never seemed to stand out much to me and my impression of them was that they tasted kind of like Brussels sprouts. Good, but nothing to get excited about.
     
  4. Jae -tea party- -tea party-

    Jae
    Joined: 24 Sep 2007
    Posts: 1614
    Location: Los Angeles, California
    Posted: Mon Nov 14, 2016 8:26 pm

    *Reopening this thread with permission from Flowers*

    I wanted to share a very simple recipe for one of my favorite dishes: chickpea salad.

    This recipe is vegetarian and can easily be made vegan by omitting the feta cheese.
      • 1 can garbanzo beans (chickpeas), drained and rinsed (any brand will do)
      • 1/2 cup diced roma tomatoes (roma tomatoes are just a personal preference. Any ripe red tomato will do)
      • 1 cup crumbled feta cheese
      • 1 red onion, chopped
      • 2 cloves garlic, minced
      • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh cilantro
      • 2 tablespoons olive oil
      • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
      • salt to taste
    Directions
    1. In a glass bowl, mix the garbanzo beans, tomatoes, feta cheese, onion, garlic, and cilantro.
    2. In a separate bowl, whisk together the olive oil, lemon juice, and salt, and pour over the salad. Refrigerate before serving.

    What are some of your favorite recipes? Do share! ::squee::
     
    Witchka likes this.
  5. flowersofnight -moderator- -moderator-

    flowersofnight
    Joined: 04 Aug 2004
    Posts: 12362
    Location: Vintage Live House, 1994
    Posted: Mon Nov 14, 2016 8:43 pm

  6. sanctum -member- -member-

    sanctum
    Joined: 10 Mar 2005
    Posts: 1386
    Posted: Mon Nov 14, 2016 9:24 pm

    Jae wrote:

    Sounds good! I'll have to try it sometime and report back!
     
  7. Jae -tea party- -tea party-

    Jae
    Joined: 24 Sep 2007
    Posts: 1614
    Location: Los Angeles, California
    Posted: Mon Nov 14, 2016 10:12 pm

    flowersofnight wrote:

    They're absolutely ADORABLE!!!! ::squee::

    I must try making these for my next totally fancy* adult game night!

    *not fancy at all!

    @CrystalAmmunition I hope you enjoy! It's a super simple dish but it's very delicious!
     
  8. sanctum -member- -member-

    sanctum
    Joined: 10 Mar 2005
    Posts: 1386
    Posted: Tue Nov 15, 2016 4:41 am

    flowersofnight wrote:
    Agh, they're too cute!

    I'm always plagued by bouts of Mana-inspired wishing that I was able to cook. Alas, I don't have the ability.
     
  9. flowersofnight -moderator- -moderator-

    flowersofnight
    Joined: 04 Aug 2004
    Posts: 12362
    Location: Vintage Live House, 1994
    Posted: Tue Nov 15, 2016 1:22 pm

    CrystalAmmunition wrote:
    Never stopped me ::meev::
     
  10. Jae -tea party- -tea party-

    Jae
    Joined: 24 Sep 2007
    Posts: 1614
    Location: Los Angeles, California
    Posted: Tue Nov 22, 2016 12:42 pm

    Now that the weather is starting to cool down over here in SoCal (well, cool for California's version of Fall - mid 60s/low 70s ::kozi::) I was wondering if anyone has any yummy soup recipes they'd like to share.

    Here is one of my favorite winter soup recipes for Potato, Carrot, and Leek soup. The soup yields 5-8 servings depending on your serving size, but the soup does freeze and thaw well. This soup is incredibly easy to make and the results are delicious! *recipe is taken from Allrecipes.com (This is the recipe I always use)*

    • 2 tablespoons butter
    • 4 leeks, chopped
    • 4 celery stalks, chopped
    • 4 cups chicken broth
    • 4 cups vegetable broth
    • 6 large potatoes, diced
    • 5 carrots, chopped
    • 2 teaspoons salt
    • 1 bay leaf
    • 1 cup heavy whipping cream
    1. Melt butter in a stock pot over medium-high heat. Cook and stir leeks and celery in butter until softened, 3 to 5 minutes. Pour chicken broth and vegetable broth into the pot; add potatoes, carrots, salt, and bay leaf.
    2. Bring the mixture to a boil and cook until the potatoes and carrots are soft, about 20 minutes. Remove and discard bay leaf.
    3. Blend soup with an immersion blender until smooth. Stir cream into the soup, reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer soup until thickened, about 20 minutes.
    edit: If you don't have an immersion blender, a regular upright blender works just as well!
     
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2016
  11. faith -tea party- -tea party-

    faith
    Joined: 05 Aug 2004
    Posts: 5026
    Posted: Fri Nov 25, 2016 8:07 pm

    Basically the only thing I cook is miso soup with veggies, ever lol
    It's

    a dash of soy sauce and mirin
    whatever dashi comes out of the packet
    scallions
    an assortment of carrots, parsnips, rutabaga, topinambour and konyaku that will fit in the pot, cut up of course lol

    Cover with water and boil until soft, then add "this much" miso paste and heat on low for a bit longer.

    If I weren't obviously cooking motivation challenged, I would try your recipe out Jae.
    It looks like it would be good for winter.


    Hanachan, the turtles are surprisingly artistic.
    I think it's time you upped your game to the next level.
    Next creation - this. I challenge you. It's on.

    http://static.boredpanda.com/blog/w...-wedding-cake-trend-17-57833e2bb38eb__700.jpg
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2016
  12. Jae -tea party- -tea party-

    Jae
    Joined: 24 Sep 2007
    Posts: 1614
    Location: Los Angeles, California
    Posted: Tue Dec 13, 2016 6:13 pm

    Since it's almost Christmas (for those that celebrate), I thought I'd share a recipe for Ponche Navideño (Mexican Christmas Punch).

    This tasty punch is served hot and if you're like myself, my friends, and my loved ones, you can add rum to make the punch 10000000x more tasty!

    1 cup dried hibiscus flowers (optional)
    2 1/2 to 3 quarts water
    2 cinnamon sticks,
    8 ounces tejocotes, left whole (available at Hispanic grocery stores)
    6 guavas, peeled and cut into bite-sized pieces
    2 mild-flavored apples peeled, cored and cut into bite-size pieces
    2 four-inch pieces of sugar cane, peeled and cut into thin strips
    1/2 cup pitted prunes, halved lengthwise
    1/2 cup dark raisins
    5 long tamarind pods, peeled and seeded, or three tablespoons of tamarind pulp without seeds
    6 to 8 ounces dark brown sugar
    Dark or Coconut Rum (optional, but delicious!)

    In a large pot, bring water, cinnamon sticks, and hibiscus flowers (if you've chosen to add them to your recipe) to a boil. Add tejocotes and reduce heat to medium-low. Cook over a slow, rolling boil for five minutes.

    Remove the tejocotes from the pot, let cool, and peel. Cut the tejocotes in half, and remove and discard the seeds.

    Once the tejocotes been peeled and de-seeded, place them back into your pot of cinnamon/hibiscus water and add the remaining ingredients. Stir to combine and let simmer for at least 30 minutes.

    When you're ready to serve, remove the cinnamon sticks, and pour punch, fruit pieces, and rum into a large mug and enjoy!
     
  13. sanctum -member- -member-

    sanctum
    Joined: 10 Mar 2005
    Posts: 1386
    Posted: Tue Dec 13, 2016 6:49 pm

    This has been one of my go-to meals lately, it claims to make 4 but I have found it makes closer to 6. I also add another 200mls of coconut milk so that it is creamier.

    Does anyone have any other good vegetarian curry recipes?
     
    etherealspirits likes this.
  14. Jae -tea party- -tea party-

    Jae
    Joined: 24 Sep 2007
    Posts: 1614
    Location: Los Angeles, California
    Posted: Wed Dec 14, 2016 11:59 am

    CrystalAmmunition wrote:
    Flowers posted this back when this thread was created. I made the recipe version (with chicken) and it was INCREDIBLE!!!! You can always sub the chicken for tofu, fake chicken, or other meat alternatives!

    flowersofnight wrote:
     
  15. flowersofnight -moderator- -moderator-

    flowersofnight
    Joined: 04 Aug 2004
    Posts: 12362
    Location: Vintage Live House, 1994
    Posted: Thu Jul 13, 2017 1:06 am

    Because curry talk is always popular ::mana:: Moving to the recipe/cooking thread XD

    CrystalAmmunition wrote:
    I usually just cook up some chicken, simmer it, then add the sauce cubes and boil it all down. They suggest adding potatoes, onions, carrots and whatnot to the stew, but none of that stuff ever seems to come out that well or be worth the bother. Maybe sometime I'll actually try making up a real chicken katsu to drown in curry slime.

    etherealspirits wrote:
    I had Java a few times and it was aight, but not Kokumaro or Vermont. Which House brand is the one you like? They have like ten.
    Alas, their restaurant seems to be a California-only thing.
     
  16. etherealspirits -dead scape- dead scape

    etherealspirits
    Joined: 28 May 2016
    Posts: 707
    Location: Mana-sama's School of Elegance and Refinement
    Posted: Thu Jul 13, 2017 1:23 am

    Vermont because I like the flavor apples add to it. Their pre-made is pretty good. I always add stuff to it. The restaurant is good too. I got hooked on their corn stew there. They do some cool limited dishes there. There is also Coco Ichibanya in California.
     
  17. etherealspirits -dead scape- dead scape

    etherealspirits
    Joined: 28 May 2016
    Posts: 707
    Location: Mana-sama's School of Elegance and Refinement
    Posted: Thu Jul 13, 2017 1:29 am

    CrystalAmmunition wrote:
    That sounds really good. Japanese curry or other? There are so many types. For Japanese, you can take any recipe and sub out chicken or beef stock for vegetable stock and just go with veggies and such for the extras. I like mushrooms in mine.

    There is a manga that has a lot of different recipes in it. Sadly it isn't getting translated often. Addicted to Curry. It's a little racy but the cooking parts are interesting and it has various recipes.
     
  18. flowersofnight -moderator- -moderator-

    flowersofnight
    Joined: 04 Aug 2004
    Posts: 12362
    Location: Vintage Live House, 1994
    Posted: Thu Aug 17, 2017 1:20 am

    etherealspirits wrote:
    I tried this out tonight but it didn't really taste like apples or honey to me ::kozi:: It was all right but I think I'm sticking to S&B and/or Java in the future.
    ... You know, unless I can get my hands on any of the junk Mana's been eating XD
     
  19. ars -member- -member-

    ars
    Joined: 03 Jan 2018
    Posts: 16
    Location: The Underworld
    Posted: Tue Jan 16, 2018 10:51 am

    Hi, first post ever lol
    Personally, I think I make a mean chocolate orange cake, though I never really had a ‘written’ recipe since I first actually made the cake a couple years back in Food Tech at school. Anyways, the closest written recipe I’ve found online is this one by Mary Berry.

    http://www.deliciousmagazine.co.uk/recipes/mary-berrys-very-best-chocolate-and-orange-cake/

    The main changes are that I forget about the apricot bits and use 2 oranges, use a cheese grater to get zest which one could use by putting it in the mixture, and then juice ‘em and stab holes into the cake after it’s baked so you can pour the orange juice into it. (Writing this, I feel like an actual professional haha :cool:) you can spread chocolate squares on top too if you want, but only right after the cake’s out so it melts into a ‘chocolate drizzle’— pretty neat trick lmao
    Sorry, I’m no expert so I may have missed something, my apologies :undecided: